Home ▸ Questions Catholics Ask
Blog
Why do Catholics light so many candles?
Posted by Alice L. Camille Friday 16, October 2020
Categories Church History , Liturgy

After electricity became standard, candlelight remained a fixture in both liturgy and devotions.

Like many liturgical practices, candle lighting began as a practical activity. It was how people turned the lights on before electricity. Early Christians illuminated the catacombs with candles. (In the same way, the lavabo—the ritual washing of the priest’s hands at the altar—was a pragmatic way to remove the residue of the people’s offering, which arrived in the sanctuary not as a basket of sanitary envelopes but as livestock and foodstuffs.)

Candles also had symbolic significance. They were placed on martyr’s graves or near saints’ images to testify that the light these holy ones bear still shines in eternity. A perpetual light at the altar acknowledges the constancy of the Real Presence. A light similarly burns near the Book of the Gospels. Votive lights at a shrine represent the prolongation of our prayer before God.

After electricity became standard, candlelight remained a fixture in both liturgy and devotions. The premiere candle in any church is also the largest: the paschal candle, blessed and lit from the new fire each year at the Easter Vigil. The paschal candle represents the light of Christ illuminating the hearts of the faithful. Five grains of incense embedded in the wax recall the wounds of Christ. As the deacon or priest carries the light forward in procession, the phrase “Light of Christ” is chanted three times, with the assembly’s reply: “Thanks be to God.” Individual candles dispersed through the assembly are lit from the paschal candle so testify that all share in the divine light.

The paschal candle is plunged into the baptismal font to bless the waters used for baptisms. Fire and water unite in this sign, reminding us of other Kingdom paradoxes: the last will be first, the poor will be blessed, and the dead will rise. At the celebration of every baptism, a candle is given to each baptismal candidate to acknowledge the light of Christ within them.

Advent, the season of light, is counted down with the violet- and rose-colored candles of the Advent wreath. Another liturgy in which candles hold a special place is the Presentation of the Lord, also called Candlemas (February 2nd). Candles were blessed on this feast which recalls the day the infant Jesus, the light of the world, was brought to the temple. This feast, honored since the 4th century, historically ended the Christmas cycle. On the following day, the memorial of St. Blaise, unlit candles are used to bless the throat and intercede for healing.

Scriptures: Genesis 1:3-5; Isaiah 9:1; Matthew 5:14-16; John 1:3-9; 3:19-21; 8:12; 9:5; 12:35-36; Ephesians 5:8-14; 1 Thessalonians 5:5; 1 John 1:5-7

Books: From the Beginning to Baptism: Scientific and Sacred Stories of Water, Oil, and Fire, by Linda Gilber, O.P. (Liturgical Press, 2010)

Signs and Symbols of the Liturgy: An Experience of Ritual and Catechesis, by Michael Ruzicki, et. al. (Liturgy Training Publications, 2018)


¿Por qué los católicos encienden tantas velas?
Posted by Alice L. Camille Friday 16, October 2020
Categories Church History , Liturgy

Después de que la electricidad se convirtió en estándar, la luz de las velas siguió siendo un elemento fijo tanto en la liturgia como en las devociones.

Como muchas prácticas litúrgicas, el encendido de velas comenzó como una actividad práctica. Así era como la gente encendía las luces antes de la electricidad. Los primeros cristianos iluminaron las catacumbas con velas. (De la misma manera, el lavabo, el lavado ritual de las manos del sacerdote en el altar, era una forma pragmática de retirar los residuos de la ofrenda del pueblo, que llegaba al santuario no como una canasta de sobres sanitarios sino como ganado y víveres.)

Las velas también tenían un significado simbólico. Fueron colocadas en las tumbas de los mártires o cerca de las imágenes de los santos para testificar que la luz que llevan estos santos aún brilla en la eternidad. Una luz perpetua en el altar reconoce la constancia de la Presencia Real. De manera similar, una luz arde cerca del Libro de los Evangelios. Las luces votivas en un santuario representan la prolongación de nuestra oración ante Dios.

Después de que la electricidad se volvió estándar, la luz de las velas siguió siendo un elemento fijo tanto en la liturgia como en las devociones. El cirio principal en cualquier iglesia es también el más grande: el cirio pascual, bendecido y encendido con el fuego nuevo cada año en la Vigilia Pascual. El cirio pascual representa la luz de Cristo que ilumina el corazón de los fieles. Cinco granos de incienso incrustados en la cera recuerdan las llagas de Cristo. Mientras el diácono o el sacerdote llevan la luz en procesión, la frase "Luz de Cristo" se canta tres veces, con la respuesta de la asamblea: "Gracias a Dios". Velas individuales dispersas por la asamblea se encienden con el cirio pascual, de modo que testifiquen que todos comparten la luz divina

El cirio pascual se sumerge en la pila bautismal para bendecir las aguas utilizadas para los bautismos. El fuego y el agua se unen en este signo, recordándonos otras paradojas del Reino: los últimos serán los primeros, los pobres serán bendecidos y los muertos resucitarán. En la celebración de cada bautismo, se entrega una vela a cada candidato al bautismo para reconocer la luz de Cristo en su interior.

El Adviento, la temporada de la luz, se cuenta hacia atrás con las velas de color violeta y rosa de la corona de Adviento. Otra liturgia en la que las velas ocupan un lugar especial es la Presentación del Señor, también llamada Candelaria (2 de febrero). Las velas fueron bendecidas en esta fiesta que recuerda el día en que el niño Jesús, la luz del mundo, fue llevado al templo. Esta fiesta, celebrada desde el siglo IV, históricamente finaliza el ciclo navideño. Al día siguiente, en el memorial de San Blas, se utilizan velas sin encender para bendecir la garganta e interceder por la curación.

Escrituras: Génesis 1: 3-5; Isaías 9: 1; Mateo 5: 14-16; Juan 1: 3-9; 3: 19-21; 8:12; 9: 5; 12: 35-36; Efesios 5: 8-14; 1 Tesalonicenses 5: 5; 1 Juan 1: 5-7

Libros: From the Beginning to Baptism: Scientific and Sacred Stories of Water, Oil, and Fire, by Linda Gilber, O.P. (Liturgical Press, 2010)

Signs and Symbols of the Liturgy: An Experience of Ritual and Catechesis, by Michael Ruzicki, et. al. (Liturgy Training Publications, 2018)


Exactly how is the Pope, a human being, infallible?
Posted by Alice L. Camille Friday 16, October 2020
Categories Doctrines & Beliefs

Significant restrictions apply on how infallibility is to be claimed.

You’ve identified the issue! The Pope isn’t infallible, precisely because he’s mortal like the rest of us. God alone is infallible. So why does the church talk about infallibility?

The issue arose as to how the church of Jesus Christ might express its authority on matters of faith and morals. The First Vatican Council ((1869-71) issued the constitution Pater Aeternus (“Eternal Pastor”), which describes “the infallible magisterium [teaching authority] of the Roman Pontiff.” Note: the Eternal Pastor is Jesus, not the pope. Also note, it’s the teaching authority exercised by the pope, not the man himself, which is described as error-free. The pope is neither infallible (immune from error) nor impeccable (immune from sin). A brief survey of the history of the papacy will demonstrate this.

Significant restrictions apply on how infallibility is to be claimed. It’s only in effect when the pope speaks ex cathedra (“from the chair” or office of Peter). So nothing he says casually over breakfast is intended. Only when the pope “defines a doctrine of faith and morals that must be held by the Universal Church” are his words deemed empowered with “that infallibility with which the Divine Redeemer willed to endow his Church.” 

Since the promulgation of Pater Aeternus, infallibility has been invoked explicitly once: in the declaration of the Assumption of Mary by Pope Pius XII in 1950. Belief in the Assumption was professed since the early centuries of the church and was not a novel revelation by Pius. Which is significant, since infallibility isn’t intended to grant popes the power to invent new doctrines. So don’t feel anxious about waking up some morning to discover some trending idea grafted onto Catholicism. 

Debate and discussion regarding infallibility, meanwhile, have been non-stop. Vatican II’s Dogmatic Constitution on the Church (Lumen Gentium) submitted that magisterial infallibility doesn’t necessarily attach to the pope but to the church. This means the college of bishops, in communion with the bishop of Rome, exercise infallibility. It’s a corporate endowment: your local bishop doesn’t get to speak infallibly as an individual.

Not everyone got on board with the infallibility clause. A dissenting group left the church to begin the “Old Catholic Church.” Some bishops felt the teaching was unnecessary, ambiguously stated, or seriously flawed. Theologians also warn of “creeping infallibility” undermining the need for teaching to evolve and church practice to reform. It helps to keep in mind that even infallibility has its limits.

Scriptures: Isaiah 22:22; Matthew 16:13-19; Luke 22:32; John 1:42; 17:20-21; 21:15-17

Books: Teaching with Authority: A Theology of the Magisterium of the Church, by Richard Galliardetz (Liturgical Press, 1997)

The Liminal Papacy of Pope Francis: Moving Toward Global Catholicity, by Massimo Faggioli (Orbis Books, 2020)


¿Exactamente cómo es el Papa? ¿Un ser humano infalible?
Posted by Alice L. Camille Friday 16, October 2020
Categories Doctrines & Beliefs

Existen restricciones importantes sobre cómo se debe reclamar la infalibilidad.

¡Has identificado el problema! El Papa no es infalible, precisamente porque es mortal como el resto de nosotros. Solo Dios es infalible. Entonces, ¿por qué la iglesia habla de infalibilidad?

Surgió el problema de cómo la iglesia de Jesucristo podría expresar su autoridad en asuntos de fe y moral. El Concilio Vaticano I (1869-71) emitió la constitución Pater Aeternus (“Pastor Eterno”), que describe “el magisterio infalible (autoridad de enseñanza) del Romano Pontífice”. Nota: el Pastor Eterno es Jesús, no el Papa. También ten en cuenta que es la autoridad de enseñanza ejercida por el Papa, no el hombre mismo, lo que se describe como libre de errores. El Papa no es infalible (inmune al error) ni impecable (inmune al pecado). Una breve reseña de la historia del papado lo demostrará.

Existen restricciones importantes sobre cómo se debe reclamar la infalibilidad. Solo tiene efecto cuando el Papa habla ex cathedra ("desde la silla" o la oficina de Pedro). Así que nada de lo que dice casualmente durante el desayuno es intencionado. Solo cuando el Papa "define una doctrina de fe y moral que debe ser sostenida por la Iglesia Universal", sus palabras se consideran empoderadas con "esa infalibilidad con la que el Divino Redentor quiso dotar a su Iglesia".

Desde la promulgación del Pater Aeternus, la infalibilidad se ha invocado explícitamente una vez: en la declaración de la Asunción de María por el Papa Pío XII en 1950. La creencia en la Asunción se profesó desde los primeros siglos de la Iglesia y no fue una revelación nueva de Pío. Lo cual es significativo, ya que la infalibilidad no pretende otorgar a los papas el poder de inventar nuevas doctrinas. Así que no te sientas ansioso por despertarte alguna mañana para descubrir alguna idea de tendencia injertada en el catolicismo.

El debate y la discusión sobre la infalibilidad, mientras tanto, no han parado. La Constitución Dogmática del Vaticano II sobre la Iglesia (Lumen Gentium) afirmaba que la infalibilidad magisterial no se vincula necesariamente al Papa sino a la Iglesia. Esto significa que el colegio de obispos, en comunión con el obispo de Roma, ejercen la infalibilidad. Es un legado corporativo: tu obispo local no puede hablar de manera infalible como individuo.

No todo el mundo se unió a la cláusula de infalibilidad. Un grupo disidente abandonó la iglesia para comenzar la "Antigua Iglesia Católica". Algunos obispos sintieron que la enseñanza era innecesaria, expresada de manera ambigua o seriamente defectuosa. Los teólogos también advierten de la “infalibilidad progresiva” que socava la necesidad de que la enseñanza evolucione y la práctica de la iglesia se reforme. Es útil tener en cuenta que incluso la infalibilidad tiene sus límites.

Escrituras: Isaías 22:22; Mateo 16: 13-19; Lucas 22:32; Juan 1:42; 17: 20-21; 21: 15-17

Libros: Teaching with Authority: A Theology of the Magisterium of the Church, by Richard Galliardetz (Liturgical Press, 1997)

The Liminal Papacy of Pope Francis: Moving Toward Global Catholicity, by Massimo Faggioli (Orbis Books, 2020)


In this era of fake news, is it a sin to share juicy but unsubstantiated reports?
Posted by Alice L. Camille Wednesday 07, October 2020
Categories Doctrines & Beliefs

The ubiquity of social media muddles an already complex issue by presuming a right to the communication of all truth—which the Catechism teaches is not an unconditional right but must be considered with the precept of fraternal love.

Yes. The very common activity you’re describing is known as calumny. It’s a sin against the eighth commandment, which decries bearing false witness. The Catechism of the Catholic Church has an entire section on our mutual responsibility to uphold the truth (nos. 2464–2513). This is a special duty at a time when credible information is harder for well-meaning folks to discern.

God is the source of all truth. Jesus calls himself “the way, the truth, and the life.” Jesus also says “you shall know the truth, and the truth will set you free.” Peddling questionable information because it’s entertaining, or supports a position we favor, means participating in the shadow trade of falsehood. The Prince of Lies runs that operation and isn’t a spirit we want to encamp with.

Our obligation to truth prompts us to speak with candor: that is, with freedom from bias or malice. Traditionally, one’s word was one’s bond, which is why we still trust people in court to tell the whole truth and nothing but the truth simply because they say they will. (And face a serious offense if they don’t.) We admire those whose word matches their deed. To act against one’s word is considered hypocrisy.

Martyrs aren’t defined as those who die in the name of religion. They’re witnesses to the truth who value it even above their own lives. Valuing the truth includes respecting the dignity of other people. The Catechism lists three errors against the truth concerning others. First, rash judgment: assuming the moral fault of a neighbor without sufficient evidence. Secondly, detraction: disclosing someone’s faults for no good reason. Calumny is last: harming another’s reputation by spreading misinformation. Both detraction and calumny are sins against charity and justice.

While lying is a direct offense against the truth, the Catechism also cautions against flattering, boasting, and malicious caricature. Some of our favorite comedians may be at fault lately with the latter. The ubiquity of social media muddles an already complex issue by presuming a right to the communication of all truth—which the Catechism teaches is not an unconditional right but must be considered with the precept of fraternal love. We must measure whether a divulgence ensures the common good or simply exposes the private lives of others—even if they are public figures. Gratuitous invasion into the privacy of others doesn’t serve the cause of truth or charity.

Scripture: Exodus 20:16; Deuteronomy 5:20; Matthew 5:33-37; John 1:14; 8:12-18, 32, 44; 12:46; 14:6; 18:37-38; Acts 24:16; Romans 3:4; 1 John 1:5-10;

Books: The Truth Will Make You Free: The New Evangelization for a Secular Age, by Robert F. Levitt, PSS (Liturgical Press, 2019) 

Paraclete: The Spirit of Truth in the Church, by Andrew Apostoli, CFR (Franciscan Media, 2005)


En esta era de noticias falsas, ¿es un pecado compartir información jugosa pero sin fundamento?
Posted by Alice L. Camille Wednesday 07, October 2020
Categories Doctrines & Beliefs

La ubicuidad de las redes sociales confunde un tema ya complejo al presumir el derecho a la comunicación de toda la verdad, el cual el Catecismo enseña no como un derecho incondicional sino como algo que debe considerarse con el precepto del amor fraterno.

Sí. La actividad muy común que estás describiendo se conoce como calumnia. Es un pecado contra el octavo mandamiento, que condena el dar falso testimonio. El Catecismo de la Iglesia Católica tiene una sección completa sobre nuestra responsabilidad mutua de defender la verdad (núms. 2464-2513). Este es un deber especial en un momento en que la información creíble es más difícil de discernir para las personas bien intencionadas.

Dios es la fuente de toda verdad. Jesús se llama a sí mismo "el camino, la verdad y la vida". Jesús también dice: "conocerás la verdad y la verdad te hará libre". Difundir información cuestionable porque es entretenida o apoya una posición que favorecemos, significa participar en el comercio oculto de la falsedad. El Príncipe de las Mentiras dirige esa operación y no es un espíritu con el que queramos acampar.

Nuestra obligación con la verdad nos impulsa a hablar con franqueza: es decir, sin prejuicios ni malicia. Tradicionalmente, la palabra de uno era el vínculo de uno, por lo que todavía confiamos en que las personas en los tribunales digan toda la verdad y nada más que la verdad simplemente porque dicen que lo harán. (Y se enfrentan a una ofensa grave si no lo hacen). Admiramos a aquellos cuya palabra coincide con sus hechos. Actuar en contra de la palabra de uno se considera hipocresía.

Los mártires no se definen como aquellos que mueren en nombre de la religión. Son testigos de la verdad que la valoran incluso por encima de sus propias vidas. Valorar la verdad incluye respetar la dignidad de otras personas. El Catecismo enumera tres errores contra la verdad sobre los demás. Primero, el juicio precipitado: asumir la falta moral de un vecino sin pruebas suficientes. En segundo lugar, la detracción: revelar las faltas de alguien sin una buena razón. La calumnia es el último: dañar la reputación de otro al difundir información errónea. Tanto la detracción como la calumnia son pecados contra la caridad y la justicia.

Si bien mentir es una ofensa directa contra la verdad, el Catecismo también advierte contra la caricatura halagadora, jactanciosa y maliciosa. Algunos de nuestros comediantes favoritos pueden estar en falta últimamente con esto último. La ubicuidad de las redes sociales confunde un tema ya complejo al presumir el derecho a la comunicación de toda la verdad, el cual el Catecismo enseña no como un derecho incondicional sino como algo que debe considerarse con el precepto del amor fraterno. Debemos medir si una divulgación asegura el bien común o simplemente expone la vida privada de otros, incluso si son figuras públicas. La invasión gratuita de la privacidad de los demás no sirve a la causa de la verdad o la caridad.

Escrituras:Éxodo 20:16; Deuteronomio 5:20; Mateo 5: 33-37; Juan 1:14; 8: 12-18, 32, 44; 12:46; 14: 6; 18: 37-38; Hechos 24:16; Romanos 3: 4; 1 Juan 1: 5-10.

Libros: The Truth Will Make You Free: The New Evangelization for a Secular Age, by Robert F. Levitt, PSS (Liturgical Press, 2019) 

Paraclete: The Spirit of Truth in the Church, by Andrew Apostoli, CFR (Franciscan Media, 2005)


How should Catholics decide how to vote?
Posted by Alice L. Camille Wednesday 07, October 2020
Categories Doctrines & Beliefs

The dignity of the human person, subsidiarity, the common good, and solidarity should inform the Catholic conscience on any occasion.

Thanks for presuming Catholics should vote! I recently met a retired woman who proudly claimed her Catholic faith. And then even more proudly admitted she’d never voted in a single election: “My trust is in God, not in dirty politics.” 

If politics is dirty, it’s because people of good will aren’t engaged in public life. The U.S. Bishops (USCCB) affirm: “As Catholics, we bring the richness of our faith to the public square.” And also: “In the Catholic Tradition, responsible citizenship is a virtue, and participation in political life is a moral obligation.” (13) Both statements appear in Forming Consciences for Faithful Citizenship: A Call to Political Responsibility (Nov. 2019). This document on social responsibility has been edited and reissued every four years since the 1976 elections.

Regrettably, the latest edition came out before the pandemic, which would surely have shaped the content. Still, it underscores the timeless principles of church social justice doctrine: the dignity of the human person, subsidiarity, the common good, and solidarity. These four pillars should inform the Catholic conscience on any occasion.

Human dignity requires a passionate defense of the unborn. Yet “equally sacred,” Pope Francis insists, are the lives of the poor, the infirm, elderly, and children. Human dignity is threatened in many ways: indifference to immigrants and refugees, xenophobia, racism, torture, human trafficking, capital punishment, gun violence, global conflict, and the environmental crisis. All must be properly viewed as life issues. All are jeopardized by the “throwaway culture” that labels some lives expendable. 

The principal of subsidiarity involves a concern raised by Pope John Paul II: that “all structures of sin are rooted in personal sin… linked to the concrete acts of individuals.” A person may feel helpless to influence institutional evil. Yet Pope Benedict XVI noted that charity is vital not only in micro-relationships (friends, family members, small groups) but also in macro ones (social, economic, political). (9) The morality of groups matter, from the family to the corporation to the international community. Larger groups have responsibility to smaller ones.

The common good is upheld when the basic unit of society, the family, is nurtured and protected. Children and women must be valued. Workers must earn a living wage. Food security, shelter, education, health care, employment, and freedom of religion must be guaranteed rights. The economy must serve people and not vice versa.

Finally, solidarity remains a Catholic value. Our relationships across society must have a “Eucharistic consistency,” with a preferential option for the poor and a welcome for the stranger. Support leaders and policies that affirm these truths.

Resource: 

Forming Consciences for Faithful Citizenship (USCCB, Nov. 2019)

https://www.usccb.org/resources/forming-consciences-for-faithful-citizenship.pdf


¿Cómo deberían los católicos decidir su voto?
Posted by Alice L. Camille Wednesday 07, October 2020
Categories Doctrines & Beliefs

La dignidad de la persona humana, la subsidiariedad, el bien común y la solidaridad deben conformar la conciencia católica en cualquier ocasión.

¡Gracias por suponer que los católicos deberían votar! Recientemente conocí a una mujer jubilada que declaraba con orgullo su fe católica. Y luego admitía con más orgullo que nunca había votado en una sola elección: "Mi confianza está en Dios, no en la política sucia".

Si la política es sucia es porque las personas de buena voluntad no se involucran en la vida pública. Los obispos de Estados Unidos (USCCB) afirman: "Como católicos, llevamos la riqueza de nuestra fe a la plaza pública". Y también: “En la Tradición Católica, la ciudadanía responsable es una virtud y la participación en la vida política es una obligación moral”. (13) Ambas declaraciones aparecen en Forming Consciences for Faithful Citizenship: A Call to Political Responsibility (Formar conciencias para una ciudadanía fiel: un llamado a la responsabilidad política) (noviembre de 2019) . Este documento sobre responsabilidad social ha sido editado y reimprimido cada cuatro años desde las elecciones de 1976.

Lamentablemente, la última edición salió antes de la pandemia, la que seguramente habría dado forma al contenido. Aún así, subraya los principios eternos de la doctrina de la justicia social de la iglesia: la dignidad de la persona humana, la subsidiariedad, el bien común y la solidaridad. Estos cuatro pilares deben conformar la conciencia católica en cualquier ocasión.

La dignidad humana requiere una defensa apasionada del nonato. Sin embargo, "igualmente sagradas", insiste el Papa Francisco, son las vidas de los pobres, los enfermos, los ancianos y los niños. La dignidad humana se ve amenazada de muchas maneras: indiferencia hacia los inmigrantes y refugiados, xenofobia, racismo, tortura, trata de personas, pena capital, violencia con armas de fuego, conflicto global y crisis ambiental. Todos deben verse correctamente como cuestiones de vida. Todos están en peligro por la "cultura del descarte" que etiqueta algunas vidas como prescindibles.

El principio de subsidiariedad implica una preocupación planteada por el Papa Juan Pablo II: que "todas las estructuras del pecado tienen sus raíces en el pecado personal ... vinculadas a los actos concretos de los individuos". Una persona puede sentirse impotente para influir en el mal institucional. Sin embargo, el Papa Benedicto XVI señaló que la caridad es vital no solo en las microrelaciones (amigos, familiares, grupos pequeños) sino también en las macro (sociales, económicas, políticas). (9) La moralidad de los grupos importa, desde la familia hasta la corporación y la comunidad internacional. Los grupos más grandes tienen la responsabilidad de los más pequeños.

El bien común se mantiene cuando se nutre y protege la unidad básica de la sociedad, la familia. Los niños y las mujeres deben ser valorados. Los trabajadores deben ganar un salario digno. La seguridad alimentaria, la vivienda, la educación, la atención médica, el empleo y la libertad de religión deben ser derechos garantizados. La economía debe servir a las personas y no al revés.

Finalmente, la solidaridad sigue siendo un valor católico. Nuestras relaciones en la sociedad deben tener una “coherencia eucarística”, con una opción preferencial por los pobres y una acogida por los extraños. Apoya a los líderes y las políticas que afirman estas verdades.

Fuente: 

Forming Consciences for Faithful Citizenship (USCCB, Nov. 2019)

https://www.usccb.org/resources/forming-consciences-for-faithful-citizenship.pdf


Why is Christianity so negative about the human body?
Posted by Alice L. Camille Friday 21, August 2020
Categories Doctrines & Beliefs

Theology of the Body
Since the body is an expression of our creatureliness, respect for the body is extended to the whole creation.

This perception comes from a limited exposure to church teaching. Actually, the church is very positive about the body. What relates to the body also relates to the spirit, since in biblical understanding body and spirit comprise the human person. “To be holy is to be whole,” as theologian Colleen Griffith expresses it. The human body has a sacramental character to it, as the literal embodiment or incarnation of divine grace. 

Because the church takes this incarnation of divine grace seriously, Catholics take what pertains to the body just as seriously. What we do with our bodies and those of others matters. This is expressed in teachings about sexual morality which get the lion’s share of attention; but also much more. Our positivist stance on the body includes championing the rights to food, shelter, clothing, and protection for all God’s people. The unborn have our allegiance, but also the poor, the imprisoned, the sick, the dying, and the unwelcome. Every instance of injustice demands a Catholic response because injustice resides in tangible systems and affects children of God in the here and now. Since the body is an expression of our creatureliness, respect for the body is extended to the whole creation, mandating profound responsibility to the natural world in which we live and move and have our being.

Scripture has no preferred word for the body. In the Old Testament, the literary device of synecdoche is widely used; that is, a part represents the whole, as when a heart is proud, hunger affects many bellies, or flesh is described as grass. Clearly the entire person is intended, but only the part is mentioned. In Daniel the word used for the whole body translates as “that which is palpable.” In Hebrew understanding, the human person is comprised of body/spirit, and to lose either aspect is to lose what is palpably human.

Jesus preserves this integrated sense of the person in his teaching that one who perceives clearly brings light to the whole body. Yet he cautions that we must avoid the one who can kill the spirit at least as much as the one who visits violence on the body.

Paul opposes any purely mystical proposals about resurrection: it’s all or nothing, body and soul together. For this reason, we must regard our bodies as temples of the Holy Spirit, not spiritualizing matters of religion as if they existed apart from the daily palpable life of every body.

Scripture: Exodus 34:18-23; Psalm 51:12; Isaiah 10:18; Micah 6:14; Daniel 5:21; Matthew 6:25; 10:28-31; Luke 11:34-36; 12:4-7; 1 Corinthians 3:16-17; 6:15-20; 12:12-26; 15:1-58

Publication: "Spirituality and the Body," Reading in Moral Theology No. 17: Colleen M. Griffith.  (Paulist Press, 2014)

Books: Spirit, Soul, Body: Toward an Integral Christian Spirituality, Cyprian Consiglio, OSB Cam. (Liturgical Press, 2015)

A Body for Glory: Theology of the Body in the Papal Collections: the Ancients, Michelangelo, and John Paul II, Elizabeth Lev and José Granados (Paulist Press, 2017)



¿Por qué el cristianismo es tan negativo con respecto al cuerpo humano?
Posted by Alice L. Camille Friday 21, August 2020
Categories Doctrines & Beliefs

Theology of the Body
Dado que el cuerpo es una expresión de nuestra condición de criaturas, el respeto por el cuerpo se extiende a toda la creación.

Esta percepción proviene de una exposición limitada a la enseñanza de la iglesia. De hecho, la iglesia es muy positiva sobre el cuerpo. Lo que se relaciona con el cuerpo también se relaciona con el espíritu, ya que en la comprensión bíblica el cuerpo y el espíritu comprenden a la persona humana. “Ser santo es estar completo”, como lo expresa la teóloga Colleen Griffith. El cuerpo humano tiene un carácter sacramental, como personificación literal o encarnación de la gracia divina.

Debido a que la iglesia toma en serio esta encarnación de la gracia divina, los católicos toman lo que pertenece al cuerpo con la misma seriedad. Lo que hacemos con nuestros cuerpos y los de los demás es importante. Esto se expresa en enseñanzas sobre moralidad sexual que reciben la mayor parte de la atención; pero también mucho más. Nuestra postura positivista sobre el cuerpo incluye defender los derechos a la alimentación, la vivienda, la ropa y la protección de todo el pueblo de Dios. Los no nacidos tienen nuestra lealtad, pero también los pobres, los encarcelados, los enfermos, los moribundos y los indeseables. Cada caso de injusticia exige una respuesta católica porque la injusticia reside en sistemas tangibles y afecta a los hijos de Dios en el aquí y ahora. Dado que el cuerpo es una expresión de nuestra condición de criaturas, el respeto por el cuerpo se extiende a toda la creación, lo que impone una profunda responsabilidad hacia el mundo natural en el que vivimos, nos movemos y tenemos nuestro ser.

Las Escrituras no tienen una palabra preferida para el cuerpo. En el Antiguo Testamento, el recurso literario de la sinécdoque se usa ampliamente; es decir, una parte representa el todo, como cuando un corazón está orgulloso, el hambre afecta a muchos vientres, o la carne se describe como hierba. Claramente se refiere a toda la persona, pero solo se menciona la parte. En Daniel, la palabra usada para todo el cuerpo se traduce como "lo que es palpable". En hebreo, la persona humana se compone de cuerpo/espíritu, y perder cualquiera de los aspectos es perder lo que es palpablemente humano.

Jesús conserva este sentido integrado de la persona en su enseñanza de que quien percibe claramente trae luz a todo el cuerpo. Sin embargo, advierte que debemos evitar al que puede matar el espíritu al menos tanto como al que ejerce violencia en el cuerpo.

Pablo se opone a cualquier propuesta puramente mística sobre la resurrección: es todo o nada, en cuerpo y alma juntos. Por esta razón, debemos considerar nuestros cuerpos como templos del Espíritu Santo, no espiritualizando asuntos de religión como si existieran aparte de la cotidiana vida palpable de cada cuerpo.

Escrituras: Éxodo 34: 18-23; Salmo 51:12; Isaías 10:18; Miqueas 6:14; Daniel 5:21; Mateo 6:25; 10: 28-31; Lucas 11: 34-36; 12: 4-7; 1 Corintios 3: 16-17; 6: 15-20; 12: 12-26; 15: 1-58

Publicaciones: "Spirituality and the Body," Reading in Moral Theology No. 17: Colleen M. Griffith.  (Paulist Press, 2014)

Libros: Spirit, Soul, Body: Toward an Integral Christian Spirituality, Cyprian Consiglio, OSB Cam. (Liturgical Press, 2015)

A Body for Glory: Theology of the Body in the Papal Collections: the Ancients, Michelangelo, and John Paul II, Elizabeth Lev and José Granados (Paulist Press, 2017)