Home ▸ Questions Catholics Ask
Blog
The New Testament doesn't mention seven gifts of the Holy Spirit. So why was I taught about them at Confirmation?
Posted by Alice L. Camille Friday 14, May 2021
Categories Doctrines & Beliefs , Sacraments

We have to become "docile" to the work of the Spirit, to make ourselves habitually open to the Spirit's influence.

How did the church arrive at the idea that we receive seven divine gifts at Confirmation? We memorized them once—wisdom, understanding, knowledge, counsel, fortitude, piety, and fear of the Lord—in case the bishop quizzed us before the sacrament. While Acts of the Apostles and Saint Paul's writings say a lot about the Holy Spirit's activity, bestowing these seven particular gifts never comes up.

The prophet Isaiah lists the gifts as we know them (see Isa 11:1-2). The Hebrew translation of this passage lists only six; the seventh, piety, derives from the Septuagint translation from which the Catholic Bible emerges. Isaiah foretells that these special characteristics will be revealed in the one who comes "from the stump of Jesse"—that is, the promised king of David's lineage who will come to rescue the people. This future king is often identified as the Messiah (Hebrew for "anointed one").

When Jesus arrives, born of David's line eight centuries after the time of Isaiah, he's recognized as the possessor of such divine gifts and therefore the fulfillment of the prophecy. He's acknowledged as the Christ (Greek for "anointed one"). In turn, Jesus promises to send the same Spirit that dwells in him to his disciples. In the upper room at Pentecost, his promise is fulfilled. So when you and I are anointed with the oil of chrism at Confirmation, it follows that we "anointed ones" are recipients of these divine gifts.

Perhaps you don't feel wise or courageous. I'm not the best specimen of piety either. Manifesting these gifts isn't something we do automatically after we're confirmed, the way superheroes suddenly manifest their superpowers. As theologians say, we have to become "docile" to the work of the Spirit, to make ourselves habitually open to the Spirit's influence. That means putting the ego aside—something we don't do without a great deal of practice.

At the same time, we understand that we are granted genuine spiritual superpowers known as charisms. These special favors bestowed by the Spirit are provided for the benefit of the church. Saint Paul recites a litany of such charisms including wisdom, knowledge, faith, healing, mighty deeds, prophecy, discernment, and the gift of tongues. Paul later lists teaching, service, and administration as additional spiritual gifts. These aren't meant to override Isaiah's list of seven. On the contrary, they suggest that the Holy Spirit is ready to provide whatever gifts the church requires.

Scripture: Isaiah 11:1-3; Psalm 143:10; John 14:15-17, 25-26; 16:7-15; 20:22-23; Acts of the Apostles 2:1-4; Romans 8:14-17; 1 Corinthians 12:4-31

Books: Fire of Love: Encountering the Holy Spirit, by Donald Goergen, OP (Paulist Press, 2006)

The Holy Spirit: Setting the World on Fire, edited Richard Lennan and Nancy Pineda-Madrid (Paulist Press, 2017)


El Nuevo Testamento no menciona los siete dones del Espíritu Santo. Entonces, ¿por qué me enseñaron sobre ellos en la Confirmación?
Posted by Alice L. Camille Friday 14, May 2021
Categories Doctrines & Beliefs , Sacraments

Tenemos que volvernos "dóciles" a la obra del Espíritu, para abrirnos habitualmente a la influencia del Espíritu.

¿Cómo llegó la iglesia a la idea de que recibimos siete dones divinos en la Confirmación? Los memorizamos una vez: sabiduría, entendimiento, conocimiento, consejo, fortaleza, piedad y temor del Señor, en caso de que el obispo nos interrogara antes del sacramento. Si bien los Hechos de los Apóstoles y los escritos de San Pablo dicen mucho sobre la actividad del Espíritu Santo, la concesión de estos siete dones particulares nunca surge.

El profeta Isaías enumera los dones tal como los conocemos (véase Isaías 11: 1-2). La traducción hebrea de este pasaje enumera sólo seis; el séptimo, piedad, se deriva de la traducción de la Septuaginta de la que surge la Biblia católica. Isaías predice que estas características especiales se revelarán en el que viene "del tronco de Isaí", es decir, el rey prometido del linaje de David que vendrá a rescatar al pueblo. Este futuro rey a menudo se identifica como el Mesías (en hebreo "ungido")

Cuando llega Jesús, nacido del linaje de David ocho siglos después de la época de Isaías, se le reconoce como el poseedor de tales dones divinos y, por lo tanto, el cumplimiento de la profecía. Es reconocido como el Cristo (en griego, "ungido"). A su vez, Jesús promete enviar el mismo Espíritu que habita en él a sus discípulos. En el aposento alto en Pentecostés, se cumple su promesa. Entonces, cuando tú y yo somos ungidos con el óleo del crisma en la Confirmación, se deduce que nosotros los "ungidos" somos receptores de estos dones divinos.

Quizás no te sientas sabio o valiente. Yo no soy el mejor ejemplo de piedad, tampoco. Manifestar estos dones no es algo que hagamos automáticamente después de ser confirmados, como los superhéroes manifiestan repentinamente sus superpoderes. Como dicen los teólogos, tenemos que volvernos "dóciles" a la obra del Espíritu, para abrirnos habitualmente a la influencia del Espíritu. Eso significa dejar el ego a un lado, algo que requiere de mucha práctica.

Al mismo tiempo, entendemos que se nos otorgan auténticos superpoderes espirituales conocidos como carismas. Estos favores especiales otorgados por el Espíritu se proporcionan para el beneficio de la iglesia. San Pablo recita una letanía de tales carismas que incluyen sabiduría, conocimiento, fe, curación, hechos poderosos, profecía, discernimiento y el don de lenguas. Más tarde, Pablo enumera la enseñanza, el servicio y la administración como dones espirituales adicionales. Estos no están destinados a anular la lista de siete de Isaías. Por el contrario, sugieren que el Espíritu Santo está listo para proporcionar los dones que la iglesia requiera.

EscriturasIsaías 11: 1-3; Salmo 143: 10; Juan 14: 15-17, 25-26; 16: 7-15; 20: 22-23; Hechos de los Apóstoles 2: 1-4; Romanos 8: 14-17; 1 Corintios 12: 4-31

Libros: Fire of Love: Encountering the Holy Spirit, by Donald Goergen, OP (Paulist Press, 2006)

The Holy Spirit: Setting the World on Fire, edited Richard Lennan and Nancy Pineda-Madrid (Paulist Press, 2017)


If you do something you didn't know is wrong, or break a church rule you didn't know exists, is it a sin?
Posted by Alice L. Camille Friday 14, May 2021
Categories Doctrines & Beliefs

Church pews
The culpability we hold for our actions is mitigated in many ways, including: "ignorance, inadvertence, duress, fear, habit, inordinate attachments, and other psychological factors."

In civil law, we hear the phrase: ignorance of the law is no excuse. Yet in moral theology, nuances determine the amount of responsibility we have for rules and laws of which we may be unaware. Our ignorance is measured, and at some degree we do hold a certain amount of responsibility.

But first, let's consider what the Catechism of the Catholic Church has to say about human freedom and responsibility in general. The culpability we hold for our actions is mitigated in many ways, including: "ignorance, inadvertence, duress, fear, habit, inordinate attachments, and other psychological factors." (CCC 1735) These factors spell out reasons we may be less guilty, or even absolved of guilt, based on the conditions under which we act. If we're honestly unaware of the moral value of what we do, we're much less liable for it. If we didn't intend to do the thing, or were forced to; if we operated under powerful influences like fear or outside pressure; if we've repeated the offense so many times we're practically compelled to it; or if we suffer from mental illness in a variety of forms—these conditions qualify our culpability to a great extent.

The question you're specifically asking is one of vincible ignorance: that which is not invincible, but can be readily overcome. How responsible am I for the ignorance under which I as a moral agent have operated? It depends on how easily I might have known or should have known that I did wrong. Vincible ignorance is defined in three degrees: simple, crass, and affected. Say, for example, you learned the holy days of obligation as a child, but missed Mass on the Assumption on August 15th. As a Catholic, it's your responsibility to observe the holy days but you were on vacation and just forgot. That's simple ignorance and it's not a serious moral failure.

However, it becomes a crass moral fault if you miss Mass every year on August 15th because you make no effort to re-educate yourself regarding obligatory holy days (Mary the Mother of God, Ascension, Assumption, All Saints, Immaculate Conception). And it becomes an affected or studied kind of ignorance if you refuse to acknowledge that the church considers these feasts to be significant and worthy of reflection in the life of the faithful and pay no attention to the liturgical calendar. Not knowing the holy days then becomes a morally weighty matter.

Scripture: Genesis 3:11-19; 4:10-15; 2 Samuel 12:1-15; Psalm 119:105-106; Sirach 15:14-15; Mark 7:18-23; Romans 1:18-21; 2:14-16; 6:17; 2 Timothy 3:14-17; 1 John 3:19-24

Books: The Call to Holiness: Embracing a Fully Christian Life, by Richard Gula, SS (Paulist Press, 2003)

Making Choices: Practical Wisdom for Everyday Moral Decisions, by Peter Kreeft (Servant Press, 1990)


Si hago algo que no sabía que estaba mal, o rompo una regla de la iglesia que no sabía que existía, ¿es pecado?
Posted by Alice L. Camille Friday 14, May 2021
Categories Doctrines & Beliefs

Church pews
La culpabilidad que tenemos por nuestras acciones se mitiga de muchas maneras, que incluyen: "ignorancia, inadvertencia, coacción, miedo, hábito, apegos desordenados y otros factores psicológicos".

En el derecho civil, escuchamos la frase: la ignorancia de la ley no es excusa. Sin embargo, en la teología moral, los matices determinan la cantidad de responsabilidad que tenemos por las reglas y leyes que quizás desconocemos. Nuestra ignorancia es medida y, hasta cierto punto, tenemos cierta responsabilidad.

Pero primero, consideremos lo que el Catecismo de la Iglesia Católica tiene que decir sobre la libertad y la responsabilidad humanas en general. La culpabilidad que tenemos por nuestras acciones se mitiga de muchas maneras, que incluyen: "ignorancia, inadvertencia, coacción, miedo, hábito, apegos desordenados y otros factores psicológicos". (CCC 1735) Estos factores explican las razones por las que podemos ser menos culpables, o incluso absueltos de culpa, según las condiciones en las que actuemos. Si sinceramente no somos conscientes del valor moral de lo que hacemos, somos mucho menos responsables de ello. Si no teníamos la intención de cometer la acción o nos viéramos obligados a hacerla; si operamos bajo influencias poderosas como el miedo o la presión externa; si hemos repetido la infracción tantas veces que estamos prácticamente obligados a hacerla; o si sufrimos de una enfermedad mental en una variedad de formas, estas condiciones califican nuestra culpabilidad en gran medida.

La pregunta que estás haciendo específicamente es una de ignorancia vencible: aquello que no es invencible, pero que se puede superar fácilmente. ¿Cuán responsable soy por la ignorancia bajo la cual he operado como agente moral? Depende de la facilidad con la que pude haber sabido o debería haber sabido que hice mal. La ignorancia vencible se define en tres grados: simple, crasa y afectada. Digamos, por ejemplo, que aprendiste los días santos de guardar cuando eras niño, pero perdiste la misa de la Asunción el 15 de agosto. Como católico, es tu responsabilidad observar los días santos, pero estabas de vacaciones y simplemente lo olvidaste. Eso es ignorancia simple y no es una falla moral seria.

Sin embargo, se convierte en una crasa falta moral si faltas a misa todos los años el 15 de agosto porque no haces ningún esfuerzo por reeducarte con respecto a los días santos obligatorios (Solemnidad de María, Madre de Dios, Ascensión, Asunción, Todos los Santos, Inmaculada Concepción). Y se convierte en una ignorancia afectada o estudiada si te niegas a reconocer que la Iglesia considera estas fiestas significativas y dignas de reflexión en la vida de los fieles y no prestas atención al calendario litúrgico. Entonces, no conocer los días santos se convierte en un asunto de peso moral.

Escrituras: Génesis 3: 11-19; 4: 10-15; 2 Samuel 12: 1-15; Salmo 119: 105-106; Eclesiástico 15: 14-15; Marcos 7: 18-23; Romanos 1: 18-21; 2: 14-16; 6:17; 2 Timoteo 3: 14-17; 1 Juan 3: 19-24

Libros: The Call to Holiness: Embracing a Fully Christian Life, by Richard Gula, SS (Paulist Press, 2003)

Making Choices: Practical Wisdom for Everyday Moral Decisions, by Peter Kreeft (Servant Press, 1990)


The Bible prohibits images, but Catholic churches are full of them. Explain?
Posted by Alice L. Camille Wednesday 14, April 2021
Categories Doctrines & Beliefs

Divinizing any creature (including wealth, power, celebrity) remains a fundamental religious prohibition.

Images have been a part of worship since the era of cave paintings. But they have a bad reputation in the Bible, starting with the First Commandment. As a result, both Jews and Muslims ban the use of images in their art and architecture (but please read Chaim Potok's wonderful novel My Name Is Asher Lev for insights into how an artist's inspiration to create clashes with the prohibition against images). The biblical problem is spelled out in that original commandment:

"I am the LORD your God, who brought you out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of bondage. You shall have no other gods before me. You shall not make for yourself a graven image, or any likeness of anything that is in heaven above, or that is in the earth beneath, or that is in the water under the earth; you shall not bow down to them or serve them. It is written: 'You shall worship the Lord your God and him only shall you serve.'"

The law's primary concern is exclusive fidelity to the God of Israel. Having just emerged from Egypt—a culture of abundant images from its hieroglyphic writing and statues to pyramids and the Great Sphinx—it was paramount not to confuse Israel's God with the deities of the land of slavery. Yet also and more poignantly, the liberating God who effected the nation's rescue is a Lord who is fundamentally free as well. Image-making can only shrink the divinity in the people's imagination. Just think how depictions of the Ancient of Days in a long white beard convinced many generations that being made in God's image implies being white and male. A God carved by human hands seems easily controllable by human rituals or reprisals. So: if God doesn't come through on your request, just withhold next year's harvest sacrifice.

Of course we know how the story goes. Even while Moses is actively receiving this prohibition on Mount Sinai, the community below is shaping a golden calf with its treasure. Ignorance of the law (that wasn't a law five minutes ago) evidently is no excuse! Yet consider how the fashioning of the Ark of the Covenant includes two cherubim of beaten gold in its design, just five chapters later. God also commands Moses to make an image of a seraph serpent to cure the people at a later date. Cherubim are likenesses of heaven above, serpents of earth below—both pointedly forbidden. The commandment's goal is even sharper here: not to forbid all image-making, but only that reverenced and served as a rival deity. "No graven images" discouraged idolatry and, simultaneously, any images that might limit or define the liberating and liberated God.

Divinizing any creature (including wealth, power, celebrity) remains a fundamental religious prohibition. The catechism notes, however, that by his incarnation Jesus introduces a new "economy" of images that assist us in venerating, not the images themselves, but the God incarnate whom they represent. (CCC no.2131-2132)

Scripture: Genesis 1:26-27; Exodus 20:2-6; 25:17-22; Leviticus 19:4; 26:1-2; Numbers 21:8-9; Deuteronomy 5:6-10; 6:4-5; Judges 17:1-6; 1 Kings12:28-30; Isaiah 30:22; 45:16; Matthew 4:10 

Books: The God of Life, by Gustavo Guttierrez/ trans. Matthew J. O'Connell (Orbis Books, 1991)

Icons in the Western Church: Toward a More Sacramental Encounter, by Jeana Visel, O.S.B. (Liturgical Press, 2016)


La Biblia prohíbe las imágenes, pero las iglesias católicas están llenas de ellas. ¿La explicación?
Posted by Alice L. Camille Wednesday 14, April 2021
Categories Doctrines & Beliefs

Las imágenes han sido parte del culto desde la era de las pinturas rupestres. Pero tienen mala reputación en la Biblia, comenzando con el Primer Mandamiento. Como resultado, tanto judíos como musulmanes prohíben el uso de imágenes en su arte y arquitectura (pero lean la maravillosa novela de Chaim Potok, Mi nombre es Asher Lev, para conocer cómo la inspiración de un artista para crear choca con la prohibición de las imágenes). El problema bíblico se explica en ese mandamiento original:

"Yo soy el SEÑOR tu Dios, que te sacó de la tierra de Egipto, de la casa de servidumbre. No tendrás dioses ajenos delante de mí. No te harás estatua de talla, ni semejanza alguna de nada que esté arriba en los cielos, o abajo en la tierra, o en el agua debajo de la tierra; no te inclinarás ante ellos ni les servirás. Está escrito: 'Adorarás al Señor tu Dios y solo él servirás.'"

La principal preocupación de la ley es la fidelidad exclusiva al Dios de Israel. Habiendo emergido de Egipto, una cultura de abundantes imágenes, desde su escritura jeroglífica y estatuas hasta las pirámides y la Gran Esfinge, era primordial no confundir al Dios de Israel con las deidades de la tierra de la esclavitud. Sin embargo, también y de manera más conmovedora, el Dios liberador que efectuó el rescate de la nación es un Señor que también es fundamentalmente libre. La creación de imágenes solo puede restringir la divinidad en la imaginación de la gente. Solo piensa cómo las representaciones de la época antigua, con una larga barba blanca, convencieron a muchas generaciones de que ser hecho a la imagen de Dios implica ser blanco y de género masculino. Un Dios tallado por manos humanas parece fácilmente controlable mediante rituales humanos o represalias. Entonces: si Dios no cumple con tu pedido, simplemente retén el sacrificio de la cosecha del siguiente año.

Por supuesto que sabemos cómo va la historia. Incluso mientras Moisés recibe activamente esta prohibición en el monte Sinaí, la comunidad de abajo está dando forma a un becerro de oro con su tesoro. ¡La ignorancia de la ley (que no era una ley cinco minutos antes) evidentemente no es excusa! Sin embargo, considera cómo la elaboración del Arca de la Alianza incluye dos querubines de oro batido en su diseño, solo cinco capítulos después. Dios también le ordena a Moisés que haga una imagen de una serpiente serafín para curar al pueblo en una fecha posterior. Los querubines son semejanzas del cielo arriba, las serpientes de la tierra abajo, ambos deliberadamente prohibidos. El objetivo del mandamiento es aún más nítido aquí: no prohibir toda la creación de imágenes, sino solo las que se reverenciaron y sirvieron como una deidad rival. "No a imágenes esculpidas" desalentaba la idolatría y, simultáneamente, a cualquier imagen que pudiera limitar o definir al Dios liberador y liberado.

Divinizar a cualquier criatura (incluidas la riqueza, el poder, la celebridad) sigue siendo una prohibición religiosa fundamental. El catecismo señala, sin embargo, que con su encarnación Jesús introduce una nueva "economía" de imágenes que nos ayudan a venerar, no las imágenes en sí mismas, sino al Dios encarnado a quien representan. (CCC núm. 2131-2132)

Escrituras: Génesis 1: 26-27; Éxodo 20: 2-6; 25: 17-22; Levítico 19: 4; 26: 1-2; Números 21: 8-9; Deuteronomio 5: 6-10; 6: 4-5; Jueces 17: 1-6; 1 Reyes 12: 28-30; Isaías 30:22; 45:16; Mateo 4:10

Libros: The God of Life, by Gustavo Guttierrez/ trans. Matthew J. O'Connell (Orbis Books, 1991)

Icons in the Western Church: Toward a More Sacramental Encounter, by Jeana Visel, O.S.B. (Liturgical Press, 2016)


What does it mean to have faith?
Posted by Alice L. Camille Wednesday 14, April 2021
Categories Doctrines & Beliefs

Believing in a set of ideas about God is quite different from putting our confidence in a vital relationship with the God who saves.

When we put our faith in other people, it means we trust them to do as they say and to follow through on their promises. It doesn't mean we believe that they exist. Yet this minimalist definition of faith seems to be what's most often applied in the realm of religion. Faith in God, in this sorry little sense, merely implies giving intellectual assent to an eternal Being out there somewhere. Faith can further imply our adherence to a certain list of beliefs taught by a group that purports to represent God: church, synagogue, mosque, or meeting hall. 

Believing in a set of ideas about God is quite different from putting our confidence in a vital relationship with the God who saves: the God who rescues us, personally, and whose promises are true. Settling for the former notion is probably the most short-changing proposition we can make in our spiritual lives. Contrast that with what happens if we extend the same faith to God we offer to people. As Jesuit theologian Michael Cook describes it, we only surrender our trust to those with whom we have a shared history that recommends such confidence. Committing our faith to another person is a "self-transcending" hour that involves risk. We become vulnerable to betrayal, deceit, or disappointment. Who would take such a risk unless the one to whom we give our faith has proven credible and worthy of it?

This is precisely the kind of faith Abraham surrenders to the God who invites him to leave home and extended family, and to embark on a future that's unseen and unknown. God promises land and descendants. If Abraham hadn't believed God was good for it, he would never have left his father's tents.

What reason might you and I have to commit our destinies to God? The Bible reveals a shared history between God and humanity in which people are frequently deceitful and disappointing. Yet God is steadfast. We can also meditate on creation itself, in which God's commitment to life, beauty, and prosperity are clearly seen. Ultimately, it's only in taking the plunge into trusting God, and accepting the invitation to journey with God as Abraham did, that we learn for ourselves that God's promises are true. As Karl Rahner says, we can settle for the mind grasping divine mysteries. Or we can permit ourselves to be grasped.

Scripture:  Genesis 12:1-7; Matthew 17:14-20; Luke 11:9-13; Romans 4:1-3, 13-25; 5:1-5; 10:4-10; 1 Corinthians 13:12-13; 2 Corinthians 5:7; James 2:14-18; 1 John 1:1-4

Books: Christology as Narrative Quest, by Michael L. Cook, S.J. (Liturgical Press, 1997)

Why Stay Catholic? Unexpected Answers to a Life-Changing Question, by Michael Leach (Loyola Press, 2011)


¿Qué significa tener fe?
Posted by Alice L. Camille Wednesday 14, April 2021
Categories Doctrines & Beliefs

Creer en un conjunto de ideas sobre Dios es muy diferente a poner nuestra confianza en una relación vital con el Dios que salva.

Cuando ponemos nuestra fe en otras personas, significa que confiamos en que harán lo que dicen y cumplirán sus promesas. No significa que creamos que existen. Sin embargo, esta definición minimalista de fe parece ser la que se aplica con mayor frecuencia en el ámbito de la religión. La fe en Dios, en este pequeño y lamentable sentido, simplemente implica dar un asentimiento intelectual a un Ser eterno ahí afuera en alguna parte. La fe puede implicar además nuestra adhesión a una determinada lista de creencias enseñadas por un grupo que pretende representar a Dios: iglesia, sinagoga, mezquita o salón de reuniones.

Creer en un conjunto de ideas sobre Dios es muy diferente a poner nuestra confianza en una relación vital con el Dios que salva: el Dios que nos rescata, personalmente, y cuyas promesas son verdaderas. Conformarse con la primera noción es probablemente la propuesta más breve que podemos hacer en nuestra vida espiritual. Compara eso con lo que sucede si le damos a Dios la misma fe que ofrecemos a las personas. Como lo describe el teólogo jesuita Michael Cook, solo entregamos nuestra confianza a aquellos con quienes tenemos una historia compartida que recomienda tal confianza. Confiar nuestra fe a otra persona es una hora de "auto-trascendencia" que implica riesgos. Nos volvemos vulnerables a la traición, el engaño o la desilusión. ¿Quién correría tal riesgo a menos que aquel a quien le damos nuestra fe haya demostrado ser creíble y digno de ella?

Este es precisamente el tipo de fe que Abraham le entrega al Dios que lo invita a dejar el hogar y a la familia extendida, y embarcarse en un futuro invisible y desconocido. Dios promete tierra y descendencia. Si Abraham no hubiera creído que Dios era bueno para eso, nunca habría abandonado las tiendas de su padre.

¿Qué razón podríamos tener tú y yo para encomendar nuestro destino a Dios? La Biblia revela una historia compartida entre Dios y la humanidad en la que las personas suelen ser engañosas y decepcionantes. Sin embargo, Dios es firme. También podemos meditar sobre la creación misma, en la que se ve claramente el compromiso de Dios con la vida, la belleza y la prosperidad. En última instancia, es solo al dar el paso en la confianza en Dios y aceptar la invitación a viajar con Dios como lo hizo Abraham, que aprendemos por nosotros mismos que las promesas de Dios son verdaderas. Como dice Karl Rahner, podemos conformarnos con que la mente capte los misterios divinos. O podemos permitirnos que nos envuelvan.

Escrituras:Génesis 12: 1-7; Mateo 17: 14-20; Lucas 11: 9-13; Romanos 4: 1-3, 13-25; 5: 1-5; 10: 4-10; 1 Corintios 13: 12-13; 2 Corintios 5: 7; Santiago 2: 14-18; 1 Juan 1: 1-4

Libros: Christology as Narrative Quest, by Michael L. Cook, S.J. (Liturgical Press, 1997)

Why Stay Catholic? Unexpected Answers to a Life-Changing Question, by Michael Leach (Loyola Press, 2011)


¿Cuáles son las diferentes formas de oración?
Posted by Alice L. Camille Thursday 01, April 2021
Categories Prayer and Spirituality

Esta no es de ninguna manera una lista completa. Considérala un lugar para comenzar.

La oración es un arte espiritual, por lo que las formas de oración difieren según el artista. La Enciclopedia del Catolicismo enumera tres categorías generales: vocal, mental y pasiva. La oración vocal es cualquier cosa que use palabras, habladas, recitadas o cantadas. Puede utilizar oraciones compuestas o espontáneas. Los salmos y la liturgia de la Misa son dos ejemplos de oraciones vocales. La oración mental, por el contrario, es una oración silenciosa que involucra la imaginación. El método de imaginería guiada de San Ignacio de Loyola y la lectura orante de las Escrituras (lectio divina) son muestras de oración mental. La oración pasiva también se conoce como contemplación. No la controlas ni la generas; le entregas todo. A cambio, el encuentro místico aguarda como un puro don de Dios. La oración pasiva puede ser extática como la experimentó Santa Teresa de Ávila. También puede relacionarse con el sufrimiento, como sucedió con el amigo de Teresa, San Juan de la Cruz.

Otra forma de imaginar las formas de oración son dos categorías que sugiere el fraile franciscano Richard Rohr: oración mental y oración corporal. Las formas vocales y mentales descritas anteriormente encajan en la idea de oración mental de Rohr. La oración corporal, por el contrario, significa "orar desde el barro", el vaso del yo formado a partir del barro y el Aliento divino. Eso incluye actividades espirituales tan diversas como caminar por un laberinto o el Vía Crucis, hacer una peregrinación, rezar con un rosario, tai chi o yoga. Dependiendo de tu nivel de participación en la oración pasiva mencionada anteriormente, estas podrían ser una oración mental o una experiencia de cuerpo completo.

La Enciclopedia Católica Moderna se vuelve más explícita, enumerando 16 formas de oración. El primer grupo es comunitario: público (oración compartida), Eucaristía (la fuente y cumbre de la fe), las Escrituras (donde Dios habla) y el Oficio Divino (oración dirigida por salmos en nombre de la humanidad). Tre Ore, la menos familiar en esta lista, es una oración de la Trinidad en la que se dedica una hora a la adoración en silencio, otra a la reflexión y la escritura, y una tercera a compartir en grupo.

La lista de MCE incluye lo familiar: oración personal, lectura espiritual, escucha en silencio, recitación (por ejemplo, rosarios, letanías), oración mental, contemplación y examen de conciencia. También explora la idea de recogimiento (recordar a Dios a lo largo del día); meditación (guiar el intelecto y la razón); oración afectiva (que involucra emociones); y llevar un diario como un mapeo interactivo del viaje espiritual.

Estas formas de oración no son de ninguna manera una lista completa. Considéralas un lugar para comenzar.

Escrituras: Números 6: 24-26; los Salmos; Mateo 6: 9-13; Lucas 1: 46-55, 68-79: 2: 29-32

En línea
• A downloadable “User’s guide on the ways to pray” by Linus Mundy
• Find Your Spirituality Type” quiz by Roger O'Brien
• What's the difference between saying ‘set’ prayers and prayers in my own words?” by Alice Camille
• How is the Mass ‘prayer’”? by Alice Camille

Libros: Prayer and Temperament: Different Prayer Forms for Different Personality Types, by C. Michael, M. Norrisey (Open Door, 1985)

The Breath of the Soul, by Joan Chittister (Twenty-Third Pub, 2009)


What are the different forms of prayer?
Posted by Alice L. Camille Thursday 01, April 2021
Categories Prayer and Spirituality

This is by no means a definitive list. Consider it a place to begin.

Prayer is a spiritual art, so recommended prayer forms vary according to the artist. In Richard McBrien’s Encyclopedia of Catholicism, three general categories are listed: vocal, mental, and passive. Vocal prayer is defined as anything that uses words—spoken, recited, or sung. It can utilize composed or spontaneous prayers. The psalms and the liturgy of the Mass are two examples of vocal prayer. Mental prayer, by contrast, is a silent reflection involving the imagination and will. Ignatian guided imagery and the use of Scripture in meditation (lectio divina) are samples of mental prayers. Passive prayer is also known as contemplation. You don’t control or generate it: you relinquish all. In return, the mystical encounter awaits as pure gift of God. Passive prayer can be ecstatic, as Teresa of Avila experienced it. It can also be a source of intense suffering, as with John of the Cross.

Another way to envision prayer forms are two categories suggested by Richard Rohr: mental prayer and body prayer. Here “mental” describes that which involves the rational being: both vocal and mental forms outlined above would fit into this idea of mental prayer. Body prayer, by contrast, means “to pray from the clay”—the vessel of the self formed from clay and divine Breath. This could include spiritual activities as diverse as walking the labyrinth or Stations of the Cross, pilgrimage, fingering rosary beads, tai chi, or yoga. Depending on your level of participation in passive prayer mentioned above, this could be a mental prayer or a full-body experience.

The Modern Catholic Encyclopedia (ed. Glazier/Hellwig) gets more explicit, listing 16 prayer forms. The first bunch are communal: public (shared prayer), Eucharist (the source and summit of our faith), Scripture (where God speaks), and the Divine Office (psalm-led prayer on behalf of humankind). Tre Ore, the least familiar on this list, is a Trinity prayer in which one hour is given to silent adoration, one to writing and reflection, and a third to group sharing.

The MCE list includes the familiar: personal prayer, spiritual reading, silent listening, recitation (rosaries, litanies), mental prayer, contemplation, the examination of conscience. It also explores the idea of recollection (bringing God to mind throughout the day), meditation (guiding the intellect and reason), affective prayer (involving the emotions and affections), and journaling as an interactive mapping of the spiritual journey. This is by no means a definitive list. Consider it a place to begin.

Scripture: Num 6:24-26; Psalms; Matthew 6:9-13; Luke 1:46-55, 68-79; 2:29-32

Online
• A downloadable “User’s guide on the ways to pray” by Linus Mundy
• Find Your Spirituality Type” quiz by Roger O'Brien
• What's the difference between saying ‘set’ prayers and prayers in my own words?” by Alice Camille
• How is the Mass ‘prayer’”? by Alice Camille

Books: Prayer and Temperament: Different Prayer Forms for Different Personality Types, by C. Michael, M. Norrisey (Open Door, 1985)

The Breath of the Soul, by Joan Chittister (Twenty-Third Pub, 2009)